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7 Trusty Tips For Those Who Love To Take Food Shots

2 months ago

7 Trusty Tips For Those Who Love To Take Food Shots

 

Chili Crabs. Photographed by Floyd Jhcoson of Studio 100

Chili Crabs. Photographed by Floyd Jhocson of Studio 100

It’s already a norm to see everyone taking a photo of their food. While some do it professionally, many find it as a habit to preserve that sensual feeling of seeing their food at its prime and celebrating its goodness before everything goes into everyone’s stomach. We feel you, because we love taking shots of our food too! So, to help you with your growing passion to get that perfect food shot, here are seven trusty, dependable food photography tips to elevate your shooting game:

 

Chocolate. Photographed by Miguel Abesamis of Studio 100

Chocolate. Photographed by Miguel Abesamis of Studio 100

  1. Make sure to clean your phone camera lens. Sometimes people forget to clean it and end up with blurry photos.

 

Baking Ingredients. Photographed by Miguel Abesamis of Studio 100

Baking Ingredients. Photographed by Miguel Abesamis of Studio 100

  1. Social media photos are about telling a story, a good idea is by using props that you’ve used to bake or cook your dish. Use the raw ingredients or kitchen equipment to add interesting elements to the table.

 

Reuben Kimchi Sandwich. Photographed by Yukie Sarto of Studio 100

Reuben Kimchi Sandwich. Photographed by Yukie Sarto of Studio 100

  1. Best time for natural light is between 6:00AM-8:00AM and 3:00PM-6:00PM. Also, look for the best light, best angle, and framing when it comes to taking photos. Don’t forget to experiment with the light especially when you can use artificial ones.

 

Pancakes with Blueberry Cream Cheese Filling. Photographed by Floyd Jhocson of Studio 100

Pancakes with Blueberry Cream Cheese Filling. Photographed by Floyd Jhocson of Studio 100

  1. Don’t be afraid of changing the set-up. Remember to be flexible and to adjust to get the shot you’ll be proud of. Also, don’t try to make it always look so perfect. Sometimes small nuances like crumbs, cracks, and smudges can make a difference.

 

“Take Out” Lobster Fried Rice. Photographed by Ed Simon of Studio 100

“Take Out” Lobster Fried Rice. Photographed by Ed Simon of Studio 100

  1. Observe your dish (subject). Look for its strength—is it textured? What’s it shape and color? What type of food is it? Also, try to consider what feeling the dishes bring, for example, for soups (comfort and satisfaction) salads (freshness and vitality), desserts (fun and whimsical). With these factors, you can deliberate how you want to tackle the composition and depth of your shot.

 

Longganisa Meatballs. Photographed by Ed Simon of Studio 100

Longganisa Meatballs. Photographed by Ed Simon of Studio 100

  1. Be creative! Don’t limit yourself with your shots. Try experimenting—from the plating, the surroundings, the style, up to the filters, and editing accessories you use. Food photography is an art form and there are no rules on how you want to shoot and present your food shots.

 

Dumshim Bulgogi. Photography by Floyd Jhocson of Studio 100

Dumshim Bulgogi. Photography by Floyd Jhocson of Studio 100

  1. Practice, practice, practice. It will hone your skills better. However, unless the food you ordered is yours, do try to limit your time when it comes to taking photos of other people’s food. You wouldn’t want your eating companions to get angry!

 

 

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